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From al...@apache.org
Subject [beam] branch master updated: Update fixed and sliding window examples to be consistent with the figures
Date Fri, 04 Oct 2019 16:45:47 GMT
This is an automated email from the ASF dual-hosted git repository.

altay pushed a commit to branch master
in repository https://gitbox.apache.org/repos/asf/beam.git


The following commit(s) were added to refs/heads/master by this push:
     new 2d42592  Update fixed and sliding window examples to be consistent with the figures
     new 37e8926  Merge pull request #9468 from ageron/patch-1
2d42592 is described below

commit 2d425926e782be1de303c8114fb762fdc732d1aa
Author: Aurélien Geron <ageron@users.noreply.github.com>
AuthorDate: Wed Sep 4 10:53:44 2019 +0800

    Update fixed and sliding window examples to be consistent with the figures
---
 website/src/documentation/programming-guide.md | 20 ++++++++++----------
 1 file changed, 10 insertions(+), 10 deletions(-)

diff --git a/website/src/documentation/programming-guide.md b/website/src/documentation/programming-guide.md
index 187d7db..5731d13 100644
--- a/website/src/documentation/programming-guide.md
+++ b/website/src/documentation/programming-guide.md
@@ -2380,14 +2380,14 @@ windows.
 
 The simplest form of windowing is using **fixed time windows**: given a
 timestamped `PCollection` which might be continuously updating, each window
-might capture (for example) all elements with timestamps that fall into a five
-minute interval.
+might capture (for example) all elements with timestamps that fall into a 30
+second interval.
 
 A fixed time window represents a consistent duration, non overlapping time
-interval in the data stream. Consider windows with a five-minute duration: all
+interval in the data stream. Consider windows with a 30 second duration: all
 of the elements in your unbounded `PCollection` with timestamp values from
-0:00:00 up to (but not including) 0:05:00 belong to the first window, elements
-with timestamp values from 0:05:00 up to (but not including) 0:10:00 belong to
+0:00:00 up to (but not including) 0:00:30 belong to the first window, elements
+with timestamp values from 0:00:30 up to (but not including) 0:01:00 belong to
 the second window, and so on.
 
 ![Diagram of fixed time windows, 30s in duration]({{ "/images/fixed-time-windows.png" | prepend:
site.baseurl }} "Fixed time windows, 30s in duration")
@@ -2398,15 +2398,15 @@ the second window, and so on.
 
 A **sliding time window** also represents time intervals in the data stream;
 however, sliding time windows can overlap. For example, each window might
-capture five minutes worth of data, but a new window starts every ten seconds.
+capture 60 seconds worth of data, but a new window starts every 30 seconds.
 The frequency with which sliding windows begin is called the _period_.
-Therefore, our example would have a window _duration_ of five minutes and a
-_period_ of ten seconds.
+Therefore, our example would have a window _duration_ of 60 seconds and a
+_period_ of 30 seconds.
 
 Because multiple windows overlap, most elements in a data set will belong to
 more than one window. This kind of windowing is useful for taking running
 averages of data; using sliding time windows, you can compute a running average
-of the past five minutes' worth of data, updated every ten seconds, in our
+of the past 60 seconds' worth of data, updated every 30 seconds, in our
 example.
 
 ![Diagram of sliding time windows, with 1 minute window duration and 30s window period]({{
"/images/sliding-time-windows.png" | prepend: site.baseurl }} "Sliding time windows, with
1 minute window duration and 30s window period")
@@ -3095,4 +3095,4 @@ public class MyMetricsDoFn extends DoFn<Integer, Integer> {
     context.output(context.element());
   }
 }
-```
\ No newline at end of file
+```


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