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From Daniel Spiewak <djspie...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: How to run a webapp in jetty
Date Thu, 19 Feb 2009 14:38:32 GMT
For the record, the Jetty Eclipse plugin broke back in 3.1 and there  
are no plans to fix it.  However, the original author has released a  
clean-room replacement under the name of "Run Jetty, Run".  Also, I  
would expect Jetty-Eclipse integration to improve in the near future  
as Jetty has now become an Eclipse sub-project.

I think that it would probably be useful to be able to launch Jetty  
from Buildr, particularly with auto-magical JavaRebel integration.   
However, I think the main use of this functionality would be for old- 
school IDE-less developers.  I would likely continue just launching  
Jetty from within Eclipse.

Daniel

On Feb 19, 2009, at 7:56 AM, Martin Grotzke <martin.grotzke@javakaffee.de 
 > wrote:

> On Wed, 2009-02-18 at 23:14 +0200, Timo Rantalaiho wrote:
>> In day-to-day development I don't see much value in running
>> the servlet container with the build tool, except for
>> automated in-container tests (that must work also on build
>> server for example). In that case too sometimes it can be
>> done with e.g. JUnit (Group)Runner that starts and stops
>> Jetty as needed.
> If the servlet container is started using the IDE or the build tool is
> not very important to me / no big difference.
>
> We just want to have a well defined way how to run the application.  
> Some
> developers here still use vi or emacs as their (I)DE and therefore  
> have
> no jetty-whatever-plugin (or is there one? *g*).
>
> I personally also used the eclipse jetty-plugin in our last project,  
> but
> this also stopped to work after some update of eclipse and I didn't
> have/spent the time to find out what the reason is, I just switched to
> "mvn jetty:run".
>
> What makes a real difference IMHO is if you have live classreloading
> working to see changes immediately, without the need to restart  
> anything
> (I don't know if it's much time, but at least I *feel* faster :)).
>
> Cheers,
> Martin
>
>
> On Wed, 2009-02-18 at 23:14 +0200, Timo Rantalaiho wrote:
>> On Sun, 15 Feb 2009, Martin Grotzke wrote:
>>> my goal is also not to restart jetty all the time. In our last  
>>> project
>>> we used tapestry5 which has built in automatic class and template
>>> reloading, therefore this was solved already. Our next project will
>>> probably be done with wicket, for which I also want to have  
>>> javarebel
>>> integrated for both class and template reloading. My goal is not to
>>> depend on a local installation of each developer but to have a build
>>> environment that provides the required bits.
>>
>> I like to do something like this
>>
>> 0) Get all project dependencies with their sources
>>    e.g.  buildr clean install idea artifacts:sources
>>   ...the dependencies include a fresh version of Jetty
>>
>> 1) develop with your favourite IDE
>>
>> 2) run Jetty programmatically in IDE with something like this
>>
>>  http://svn.apache.org/repos/asf/wicket/trunk/wicket-quickstart/src/main/java/org/apache/wicket/quickstart/Start.java
>>
>>  ...on javarebel if you want better hotswap than plain Java debug  
>> mode
>>
>> 3) only restart Jetty when necessary
>>
>> 4) only repeat 0) when dependencies change (or you are
>>   using snapshots)
>>
>> In day-to-day development I don't see much value in running
>> the servlet container with the build tool, except for
>> automated in-container tests (that must work also on build
>> server for example). In that case too sometimes it can be
>> done with e.g. JUnit (Group)Runner that starts and stops
>> Jetty as needed.
>>
>> Best wishes,
>> Timo
>>

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