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From Eli Levine <elilev...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Understanding the science and concepts behind Calcite
Date Sun, 30 Apr 2017 19:09:08 GMT
Relational algebra concepts are presented well in "Database Management
Systems" by Ramakrishnan/Gehrke. That's what I used for my undergrad
DBMS course.

Eli

On Sun, Apr 30, 2017 at 10:44 AM, Khai Tran <khtran@linkedin.com.invalid> wrote:
> I dont know any undergrad database teaching about the Volcano optimizer.
> It's probably too hard for undergrad level. For relation algebra and
> System-R style optimizer, this is a good one:
> http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~cs564-1/schedule.html
>
> On Sat, Apr 29, 2017 at 3:17 PM, Julian Hyde <jhyde@apache.org> wrote:
>
>> Adding dev@drill to the cc list, because Muhammad also asked the question
>> there. But please reply to dev@calcite only.
>>
>> I gave a talk “Why you should care about relational algebra”[1], intended
>> for an audience of people who know SQL, but with a lot of details about
>> algebra and algebraic transformations.
>>
>> And you could do a lot worse than read Graefe & McKenna’s original Volcano
>> planner paper[2]. Also Graefe's later Cascades paper. (Graefe just received
>> the 2017 SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award[3], well deserved. Frankly,
>> you should read everything he ever wrote! I love his work on hybrid hash
>> join and comparing sort-based and hash-based algorithms.)
>>
>> Most of the terms Graefe uses are the same as we use in Calcite. We say
>> “filter” because “select” confuses everyone who knows SQL. Graefe’s
>> “physical properties” are our “traits” and he has another term for what we
>> call “importance”. Our “converter” is his “enforcer”. Our “row type”
is his
>> “schema”. Our “set” is his “equivalence class”, and our “subset”
is an
>> equivalence class combined with a particular set of physical properties. We
>> mix his “logical” and “physical” algebras into one algebra, and introduce
a
>> new concept of “calling convention” so that you can mix logical algebra
>> with multiple physical algebras in hybrid plans.
>>
>> Does anyone know of a good undergraduate treatment of relational algebra
>> and query optimization?
>>
>> Julian
>>
>> [1] https://calcite.apache.org/community/#more-talks <
>> https://calcite.apache.org/community/#more-talks>
>>
>> [2] http://www.cs.colorado.edu/department/publications/
>> reports/docs/CU-CS-563-91.pdf <http://www.cs.colorado.edu/
>> department/publications/reports/docs/CU-CS-563-91.pdf>
>>
>> [3] https://sigmod.org/sigmod-awards/ <https://sigmod.org/sigmod-awards/>
>>
>> > On Apr 29, 2017, at 10:22 AM, Muhammad Gelbana <m.gelbana@gmail.com>
>> wrote:
>> >
>> > I'm trying to understand the scientific concepts behind Calcite and I was
>> > wondering if anyone would kindly recommend articles\papers\books\topic-
>> titles
>> > that would help me understand Calcite from the ground up.
>> >
>> > For instance, I'm not fully understanding what are:
>> >
>> >   - Relational expressions
>> >   - Row expressions
>> >   - Calling conventions
>> >   - Relational traits
>> >   - Relational traits definitions
>> >
>> > I'm currently looking for books about "Relational Algebra", but when look
>> > into one, I can't find anything about traits or calling conventions. Or
>> am
>> > I not searching for the correct keywords ?
>>
>>

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