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From Andy Coates <andy.coa...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Identifying a VM's ROOT disk offering via the database
Date Wed, 26 Jun 2013 01:49:54 GMT
That's fine if Disk Offerings are only applicable to DATA disks - a little
odd but presumably a reason for doing it like that.

As I mentioned earlier - some of our Disk Offerings use SATA disks, some
use SAS etc, so it's important we know which backend is being used.  This
was achieved with tags.

Does this mean we have to also implement tags for Service Offering?  I
always thought that disks used Disk Offerings so that the Service Offering
remained flexible enough to cover CPU/RAM, but if we also have to assign
tags on the Service Offering this means we would have to duplicate Service
Offerings that use a different storage.

If that's just how it is then we'll just have to work with that.

Thanks for the information so far.


On 26 June 2013 02:46, Koushik Das <koushik.das@citrix.com> wrote:

> As I had mentioned in my last mail ROOT disk is created based on the
> service offering. There is NO separate disk offering associated with a ROOT
> disk. Disk offering is only for DATA disks.
> What specific properties are you interested in for the ROOT disk?
>
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: Andy Coates [mailto:andy.coates@gmail.com]
> > Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2013 1:27 PM
> > To: users@cloudstack.apache.org
> > Subject: Re: Identifying a VM's ROOT disk offering via the database
> >
> > The Service Offering isn't a DISK Offering though, it only specifies
> CPU, RAM
> > etc.  How do you find the DISK Offering????
> >
> > (I feel like I'm going around in circles here lol!)
> >
> >
> > On 25 June 2013 13:59, Koushik Das <koushik.das@citrix.com> wrote:
> >
> > > For ROOT disk the service offering gets used. For data disk you use
> > > the disk offering. The 'disk_offering' table has a field called 'type'
> > > which says if it is a disk or service offering.
> > >
> > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > From: Andy Coates [mailto:andy.coates@gmail.com]
> > > > Sent: Tuesday, June 25, 2013 8:11 AM
> > > > To: users@cloudstack.apache.org
> > > > Subject: Re: Identifying a VM's ROOT disk offering via the database
> > > >
> > > > Unfortunately no, that's the Service Offering ID.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > On 25 June 2013 07:20, Koushik Das <koushik.das@citrix.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > > Check out the 'volumes' table in the database. There is a
> > > > > 'disk_offering_id' column. Based on this id check the
> 'disk_offering'
> > > > > table to see the details.
> > > > > Is this what you are looking for?
> > > > >
> > > > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > > > From: Andy Coates [mailto:andy.coates@gmail.com]
> > > > > > Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 7:43 PM
> > > > > > To: users@cloudstack.apache.org
> > > > > > Subject: Re: Identifying a VM's ROOT disk offering via the
> > > > > > database
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Hi Sanjay,
> > > > > >
> > > > > > That may be the case, but how do you identify what Disk Offering
> > > > > > those ROOT disks are based on?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > After you create a VM you can identify its Service Offering,
but
> > > > > > not its
> > > > > Disk
> > > > > > Offering - and that's what I'm trying to establish here.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Some of our Disk Offerings use SATA disks, some use SAS, or
even
> > > > > > Fiber Channel.  When a VM is created from an ISO you can choose
> > > > > > the Disk Offering, but where is that information stored
> afterwards?
> > > > > > Likewise if I made a template of that new VM's disk, would it
> > > > > > continue to use the same Disk Offering the original VM was made
> > > > > > on,
> > > and
> > > > where can I identify that?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Andy.
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > > > On 24 June 2013 21:58, Sanjay Tripathi
> > > > > > <sanjay.tripathi@citrix.com>
> > > > > wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > Andy,
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > If you are deploying a VM from an ISO, the DATA DISK you
> > > > > > > select becomes the ROOT DISK for that VM and if you are
> > > > > > > deploying a VM from a template, then the size of template
> > > > > > > becomes the size of ROOT DISK and you can select additional
> > > > > > > DISK as DATA DISK from disk offering for the
> > > > > VM.
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > --Sanjay
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > -----Original Message-----
> > > > > > > > From: Andy Coates [mailto:andy.coates@gmail.com]
> > > > > > > > Sent: Monday, June 24, 2013 6:33 PM
> > > > > > > > To: users@cloudstack.apache.org
> > > > > > > > Subject: Identifying a VM's ROOT disk offering via
the
> > > > > > > > database
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > Hey,
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > Does anyone know where in the database you can find
out what
> > > > > > > > Disk Offering a VM's ROOT disk is based on?
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > To follow on from that, if you made a template from
a new VM
> > > > > > > > (via ISO
> > > > > > > > image) that, for example, used MyDiskOfferingA, would
> > > > > > > > further instances
> > > > > > > of
> > > > > > > > that template also use the same Disk Offering (as
you cannot
> > > > > > > > change the ROOT disk offering from a template instantiation)?
> > > > > > > > The templates assign
> > > > > > > the
> > > > > > > > same disk size, I'm just not sure how it knows if
it's a
> > > > > > > > specific Disk
> > > > > > > Offering or
> > > > > > > > not.
> > > > > > > >
> > > > > > > > Thanks,
> > > > > > > > Andy.
> > > > > > >
> > > > >
> > >
>

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