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From Ted Dunning <ted.dunn...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Recommended reading
Date Mon, 28 Mar 2011 05:38:06 GMT
I have found that learning about R is a difficult thing.  The best
introduction I have seen is, paradoxically, not really a book about R and
assumes a statistical mind-set that I disagree with.  That introduction is
in MASS (http://www.stats.ox.ac.uk/pub/MASS4/).  Other references also
exist:

http://www.r-tutor.com/r-introduction
http://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/R-intro.pdf
http://faculty.washington.edu/tlumley/Rcourse/

In addition, you should see how to plot data well:

http://www.statmethods.net/advgraphs/trellis.html
http://had.co.nz/ggplot2/

Generally, I learn more about R by watching people and reading code than by
reading books.  There are many small tricks like how to format data
optimally, how to restructure data.frames, common ways to plot data, which
libraries do what and so on that an introductory book cannot convey general
principles that will see you through to success.

On Sun, Mar 27, 2011 at 9:43 PM, Dmitriy Lyubimov <dlieu.7@gmail.com> wrote:

> BTW what about R? There is literally tons of books in R series devoted
> to rather isolated problems but what would be a good crush course
> book?
>
> On Tue, Mar 8, 2011 at 12:11 PM, Ted Dunning <ted.dunning@gmail.com>
> wrote:
> > Strang is very hard to beat for linear algebra.
> >
>

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