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From Bo Berglund <bo.bergl...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Moving CVS to SVN - multiple repositories with different permissions
Date Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:21:51 GMT
On Wed, 15 Nov 2017 08:55:27 -0500, Nico Kadel-Garcia
<nkadel@gmail.com> wrote:

>I think you're going to hurt yourself if you try to assemble cvs2svn
>from scratch with individual components, installed separately and
>built into a Windows environment. I *urge* you to save yourself a lot
>of work and use 64-bit CygWin in a Windows environment, which can
>contain up-to-date python, up-to-date command line Subversion tools
>and a server, and a more reliably consistent scripting environment.
>
>
>> Oh! That brings up yet another point:
>> On Windows Server 2016 it seems like Microsoft has included their web
>> server (IIS), but I think that Apache is needed for SVN.
>> How can one deal with that?
>> Or is SVN a server all by itself?
>
>You've a set of options, very well documented in the "Red Book" at
>http://svnbook.red-bean.com/. Apache, or httpd as version 2.x is
>called, with mod_svn, is a common approach and well supported. Apache
>can run alongside IIS, or IIS ignored, as long as they do not run on
>the same network ports. There is also "svnserve", the built-in server,
>though it's not perhaps as flexible as httpd nor built into port 443
>firewalls as commonly HTTPS is commonly supported. And there is also
>"svn+ssh", which allows an SSH daemon with tuned credentials to allow
>"svnserve" local access. I personally find svn+ssh more secure for
>various reasons, especially because the Subversion command line tool
>stores httpd credentials in plain text in a user's home directory, by
>default, but folks on this list have previously expressed their
>irritation at me for bringing that up.

I guess that VisualSVN server installation can deal with that?
It will be a server side issue anyway, not really affecting he CVS
data migration.
I googled svn port and found that it uses 3690, so that would not
interfere with http port 80, I guess.

>I'd encourage you to use the simplest, most integrated tools you can
>find for the server, and spend your development time on activating
>time on reliable backup, and your user education time on getting users
>accustomed to the new workflow.

Well, what I had in mind was this:
Server installation
-------------------
I would use VisualSVN since that seems to be a complete package (not
so many alternatives around for Windows really).
This would be done on the new Windows 2016 server.

CVS(NT) migration
-----------------
I thought I could do that on my Windows 7 X64 PC by using a copy of
the actual repository files and using cvs2svn as the tool.
I already have ActiveState Python 2.7.1 installed.
So I would create one dump file per CVS repository and then later
import those into the SVN server.

Now I have read up a lot on the svn help pages and found that I need
to use the config file option for cvs2svn in order to specify all the
different modules in the CVS repositories I need to convert.
It also seems like in order to include the authors of all the
revisions of the files I really need the option file so I can map the
CVS users to the svn users. And I also need the --use-cvs option.

But unfortunately that brought me to a full stop becuase when I looked
inside the config file example it turned out that the command line
options I had imagined would be listed really are not there, the
config file uses completely different options it looks like (or at
least different syntax for the same options)...



-- 
Bo Berglund
Developer in Sweden


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