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From hls...@apache.org
Subject cvs commit: jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide state.xml spec.xml configuration.xml
Date Fri, 07 Feb 2003 04:28:12 GMT
hlship      2003/02/06 20:28:12

  Modified:    doc/src/UsersGuide state.xml spec.xml configuration.xml
  Log:
  Update User's Guide with more info on properties and server-side state.
  
  Revision  Changes    Path
  1.4       +297 -127  jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide/state.xml
  
  Index: state.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide/state.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.3
  retrieving revision 1.4
  diff -u -r1.3 -r1.4
  --- state.xml	24 Jan 2003 00:49:34 -0000	1.3
  +++ state.xml	7 Feb 2003 04:28:12 -0000	1.4
  @@ -22,11 +22,108 @@
   the Visit and persistent page properties.
   </para>
   
  +<section id="state.general">
  +	<title>Understanding Servlet State</title>
  +	
  +
  +<para>
  +Managing server-side state is oneof the most complicated and error-prone aspects of web
  +application design, and one of the areas where Tapestry provides the most benefit.  Generally
  +speaking, Tapestry applications which are functional within a single server will be functional
within
  +a cluster with no additional effort.  This doesn't mean planning for clustering, and testing
of
  +clustering, is not necessary; it just means that, when using Tapestry, it is possible to
narrow
  +the design and testing focus.	
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +The point of server-side state is to ensure that information about the user acquired during
the session
  +is available later in the same session.  The canonical example is an application that requires
some form of
  +login to access some or all of its content; the identify of the user must be collected
at some point (in
  +a login page) and be generally available to other pages.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +The other aspect of server-side state concerns failover.  Failover is an aspect of highly-available
computing
  +where the processing of the application is spread across many servers.  A group of servers
used
  +in this way is referred to as a <emphasis>cluster</emphasis>.  
  +Generally speaking (and this may vary significantly between vendor's implementations)
  +requests from a particular client will be routed to the same server within the cluster.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +In the event that the particular server in question fails (crashes unexpectedly, or otherwise
brought 
  +out of service), future requests from the client will be routed to a different, surviving
server
  +within the cluster.  This failover event should occur in such a way that the client is
unaware that
  +anything exceptional has occured with the web application; and this means that any server-side
state
  +gathered by the original server must be available to the backup server.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +The main mechanism for handling this using the Java Servlet API is the &HttpSession;.
 The session can store
  +<emphasis>attributes</emphasis>, much like a &Map;.  Attributes are object
values referenced with
  +a string key.  In the event of a failover, all such attributes are expected to be available
on the
  +new, backup server, to which the client's requests are routed.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +Different application servers implement &HttpSession; replication and failover in different
ways; the servlet API
  +specification is delibrately unspecific on how this implementation should take place. 
Tapestry
  +follows the conventions of the most limited interpretation of the servlet specification;
it assumes
  +that attribute replication only occurs when the &HttpSession; <function>setAttribute()</function>

  +method is invoked
  +<footnote>
  +	<para>
  +This is the replication strategy employed by BEA's WebLogic server.
  +	</para>
  +</footnote>.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +Attribute replication was envisioned as a way to replicate simple, immutable objects
  +such as &String; or &Integer;.  Attempting to store mutable objects, such as &List;,
&Map; or some user-defined
  +class, can be problematic.  For example, modifying an attribute value after it has been
stored into the 
  +&HttpSession; may cause a failover error.  Effectively, the backup server sees a snapshot
of the object
  +at the time that <function>setAttribute()</function> was invoked; any later
change to the object's
  +internal state is <emphasis>not</emphasis> replicated to the other servers
in
  +the cluster!  This
  +can result in strange and unpredictable behavior following a failover.
  +</para>
  +
   <para>
  -The Engine is important because, ultimately, it is the lone object stored into the &HttpSession;.
 Because it
  -is persistent, the Visit and all page properties are also persistent.
  +Tapestry attempts to sort out the issues involving server-side state in such a way that
they
  +are invisible to the developer.  Most applications will not need to explicitly access the
&HttpSession; at
  +all, but may still have significant amounts of server-side state.  The following
  +sections go into more detail about how Tapestry approaches these issues.	
   </para>
   
  +
  +</section>  <!-- state.general -->
  +
  +<section id="state.engine">
  +	<title>Engine</title>
  +	
  +<para>
  +The engine, a class which implements the interface &IEngine;, is the central object
that is
  +responsible for managing server-side state (among its many other
  +responsibilities).  The engine is itself stored as an &HttpSession; attribute.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +Because the internal state of the engine can change, the framework will re-store
  +the engine into the &HttpSession; at the end of most requests.  This ensures that
  +any changes to the
  +<link linkend="state.visit">Visit object</link>	are properly replicated.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +The simplest way to replicate server-side state is simply not to have any.  With some
  +care, Tapestry applications can
  +<link linkend="state.stateless">run stateless</link>, at least until some
  +actual server-side state is necessary.
  +</para>
  +
  +</section>  <!-- state.engine -->
  +
   <section id="state.visit">
   	<title>Visit Object</title>
   	
  @@ -36,6 +133,15 @@
   any class whatsoever, even &Map;.
   </para>
   
  +
  +<para>
  +The name, "Visit", was selected to emphasize that whatever data is stored in the Visit
  +concerns just a single visit to the web application.  Tapestry is stricly concerned with
  +providing the presentation layer of the application; it doesn't include any kind of database
access,
  +or any other kind of long-term data storage.  However, it is very easy to interface
  +a Tapestry application to any kind of backend system.
  +</para>
  +
   <para>
   The following example demonstrates how a listener method
   may access the visit object.
  @@ -54,12 +160,22 @@
   </example>
   
   <para>
  +In most cases, listener methods, such as <function>formSubmit()</function>,
are implemented directly
  +within the page.  In that case, the first line can be abbreviated to:
  +<informalexample>
  +<programlisting>
  +    Visit visit = (Visit)getVisit();
  +</programlisting>
  +</informalexample>
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
   The Visit object is instantiated lazily, the first time it is needed.  Method
   <function>createVisit()</function> of &AbstractEngine; is responsible for
this.
   </para>
   
   <para>
  -In most cases, the Visit is an ordinary JavaBean, and therefore, has a no-arguments
  +In most cases, the Visit object is an ordinary JavaBean, and therefore, has a no-arguments
   constructor.  In this case, the complete class name of the
   Visit is specified as 
   <link linkend="configuration.search-path">configuration property</link>
  @@ -110,6 +226,37 @@
   
   </section> <!-- state.visit -->
   
  +<section id="state.global">
  +	<title>Global Object</title>
  +	
  +<para>
  +The application Global object is very similar to the application Visit object with some
key differences.
  +The Global object is shared by all instances of the application engine; ultimately, it
is stored
  +as a &ServletContext; attribute.  The Global object is therefore not persistent in
any way.  In a failover, 
  +the engine will connect to a new instance of the Global object within the new server.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +The Global object may be accessing using the <literal>global</literal> property
of either the
  +page or the engine (unlike the <literal>visit</literal> property, they are
completely equivalent).
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +Care should be taken that the Global object is threadsafe; since many engines (from many
sessions,
  +in many threads) will access it simulatenously.  The default Global object is a synchronized
  +&HashMap;.  This can be overriden with
  +<link linkend="configuration.search-path">configuration property</link>
  +<literal>net.sf.tapestry.global-class</literal>.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +The most typical use of the Global object is to interface to J2EE resources such as EJB
home and remote
  +interfaces or JDBC data sources.  The shared Global object can cache home and remote interfaces
that 
  +are efficiently shared by all engine instances.	
  +</para>
  +
  +</section>  <!-- state.global -->
  +
   <section id="state.page-properties">
   	<title>Persistent Page Properties</title>
   	
  @@ -132,7 +279,8 @@
   Tapestry bypasses most of these issues by <emphasis>not</emphasis> sharing
objects between threads and clients.
   For the duration of a request, a page and all components within the page are reserved to
the single request.
   There is no chance of conflicts because only the single thread processing the request will
have access
  -to the page.  At the end of the request cycle, the page is returned to a pristine state
and returned to the shared pool,
  +to the page.  At the end of the request cycle, the page is reset back to a pristine state
and 
  +returned to the shared pool,
   ready for reuse by the same client, or by a different client.
   </para>
   
  @@ -147,21 +295,145 @@
   properties of the page that changed during the processing of the request must be returned
to thier initial values.
   </para>
   
  +<para>
  +Tapestry separates the persistent state of a page from any instance of the page. 
  +This is very important, because
  +from one request cycle to another, a different instance of the page may be used ... even
when clustering is
  +not used.  Tapestry has many copies of any page in a pool, and pulls an arbitrary instance
out of the pool
  +for each request.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +In Tapestry, a page may have many properties
  +and may have many components, each with many properties, but only a tiny number of all
those
  +properties needs to persist between request cycles.
  +On a later request, the same or different page instance may be used.  With a little
  +assistance from the developer, 
  +the Tapestry framework can create the illusion that the same page instance is being used
in
  +a later request.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +Each persistent page property is stored individually as an &HttpSession; attribute.
 
  +Like the Servlet API, persistent properties work best with immutable objects
  +such as &String; and Integer;.  For mutable objects (including &List; and &Map;),
Tapestry makes a
  +<emphasis>copy</emphasis>
  +of the property.  In the worst case, Tapestry may have to serialize and deserialize the
object to make a copy.
  +Using several properties with simple, immutable types is therefore much less expensive
than using
  +a single, custom, complex, mutable object.
  +</para>
  +
  +
  +<para>
  +Persistent properties make use of a &spec.property-specification; element in the
  +page or component specification.  Tapestry does something special when a component
  +contains any such elements; it dynamically generates a subclass that provides the desired
fields,
  +methods and whatever extra initialization or cleanup is required.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +You may also, optionally, make your class abstract, and define abstract accessor methods
that will
  +be filled in by Tapestry in the generated subclass.  This allows you to read and update
properties inside
  +your class, inside listener methods.
  +</para>
  +
   <note>
   <para>
  -The following sections describe a scheme used through Tapestry release 2.3.  In release
2.4
  -<link linkend="state.declarative-properties">declarative properties</link>
are used instead, since
  -they are much easier.
  +Properties defined this way may be either transient or persistent.  It is useful to define
  +even transient
  +properties using the &spec.property-specification; element because doing so ensures
that
  +the property will be properly reset at the end of the request (before the page
  +is returned to the pool for later reuse).
   </para>
   </note>
  +	
  +<example>
  +<title>Persistent Page Property: Java Class</title>
  +<programlisting>
  +public abstract class MyPage extends &BasePage;
  +{
  +    abstract public int getItemsPerPage();
  +	
  +    abstract public void setItemsPerPage(int itemsPerPage);
  +}
  +</programlisting>
  +</example>	
  +
  +<example>
  +<title>Persistent Page Property: Page Specification</title>
  +<programlisting>
  +<![CDATA[
  +<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
  +<!DOCTYPE page-specification PUBLIC 
  +	"-//Howard Lewis Ship//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN" 
  +	"http://tapestry.sf.net/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd">
  +	
  +<page-specification class="MyPage">
  +
  +  <property-specification name="itemsPerPage" persistent="yes" type="int" initial-value="10"/>
  +
  +</page-specification>
  +]]>
  +</programlisting>
  +</example>	
  +
  +<para>
  +Again, making the class abstract, and defining abstract accessors is <emphasis>optional</emphasis>.
  +It is only useful when a method within the class will need to read or update the property.
 It
  +is also valid to just implement one of the two accessors.  The enhanced subclass will
  +always include both a read and a write accessor.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +This exact same technique can be used with components as well as pages.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +A last note about initialization.  After Tapestry invokes the <function>finishLoad()</function>
  +method, it processes the initial value provided in the specification.  If 
  +the <literal>initial-value</literal> attribute is ommitted or blank, no change
takes place.
  +Tapestry then takes a snapshot of the property value, which it retains 
  +and uses at the end of each request cycle
  +to reset the property back to its "pristine" state.
  +</para>
   
   <para>
  -The best way to do this is to implement the method <function>initialize()</function>
on your page.  This method is invoked
  +This means that you may perform initialization for the property inside
  +<function>finishLoad()</function> (instead of providing a <literal>initial-value</literal>).
 However,
  +don't attempt to update the property from <function>initialize()</function>
... the order of operations
  +when the page detaches is not defined and is subject to change.
  +</para>
  +
  +
  +	
  +</section> <!-- state.page-properties -->
  +
  +<section id="state.manual-page-properties ">
  +	<title>Implementing Persistent Page Properties Manually</title>
  +	
  +<warning>
  +<para>
  +There is very little reason to implement persistent page properties manually.  Using
  +the &spec.property-specification; element is much easier, and nearly as efficient.
 It is
  +highly unlikely that the extra developer effort used to implement persistent page properties
  +manually will pay off in any improvement in application throughput.
  +</para>
  +</warning>	
  +	
  +<para>
  +The preferred way to
  +implement persistent page properties without using
  +the &spec.property-specification; element is to implement the method <function>initialize()</function>
on your page.  This method is invoked
   once when the page is first created; it is invoked again at the end of each request cycle.
 An empty implementation
   of this method is provided by &AbstractPage;.
   </para>
   
   
  +<para>
  +The first example demonstrates how to properly implement a transient property.  It is simply
  +a normal JavaBean property implementation, with a little extra to reset the property
  +back to its pristine value (<literal>null</literal>) at the end of the request.
  +</para>
   
   <example>
   	<title>Use of <function>initialize()</function> method</title>
  @@ -195,26 +467,10 @@
   </para>
   
   <para>
  -Now that we've shown how Tapestry allows pages to have <emphasis>transient</emphasis>
state, we'll
  +Now that we've shown how to manually implement  <emphasis>transient</emphasis>
state, we'll
   show how to handle <emphasis>persistent</emphasis> state.
   </para>	
   
  -<para>
  -Tapestry separates the persistent state of a page from any instance.  This is very important,
because
  -from one request cycle to another, a different instance of the page may be used ... even
when clustering is
  -not used.  Again, Tapestry has many copies of any page in a pool, and pulls one instance
out of the pool
  -for each request.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -In Tapestry, a page may have many properties
  -and may have many components, each with many properties but only a tiny number of all those
  -properties needs to persist between request cycles.
  -On a later request, the same or different page instance may be used.  With a little
  -assistance from the developer, 
  -the Tapestry framework can create the illusion that the same page instance is being used
in
  -a later request.
  -</para>
   
   <para>
   For a property to be persistent, all that's necessary is that the accessor method notify
  @@ -230,7 +486,7 @@
   </para>
   
   <example>
  -<title>Persistent Page Property</title>
  +<title>Manual Persistent Page Property</title>
   <programlisting>
   public class MyPage extends &BasePage;
   {
  @@ -257,21 +513,22 @@
   </example>
   
   <para>
  -This sets up a property, <varname>itemsPerPage</varname> with a default value
of 10.  If
  +This sets up a property, <varname>itemsPerPage</varname>, with a default value
of 10.  If
   the value is changed (perhaps by a form or a listener method),
   the changed value will "stick" with the user who changed it, for the duration of their
   session.
   </para>
   	
  -</section> <!-- state.page-properties -->
  +</section> <!-- state.manual-page-properties -->
   
  -<section id="state.component-properties">
  -	<title>Persistent Component Properties</title>
  +<section id="state.manual-component-properties">
  +	<title>Manual Persistent Component Properties</title>
   	
   <para>
  -Transient and persistent properties are not limited just to pages.  The can be implemented
  -by components as well, though this takes slightly more work.  The <function>fireObservedChange()</function>
  -method is available to components as well as pages, but the initialization is slightly
more complicated.
  +Implementing transient and persistent properties inside components involves more work.

  +The <function>fireObservedChange()</function>
  +method is available to components as well as pages, but the initialization of
  +the component is more complicated.
   </para>
   
   <para>
  @@ -282,8 +539,7 @@
   
   <para>
   The Java interface &PageDetachListener; is the event listener interface for this purpose.
 
  -By simply implementing this interface
  -, Tapestry will register the component as a listener and ensure that
  +By simply implementing this interface, Tapestry will register the component as a listener
and ensure that
   it receives event notifications at the right time (this works for the two other
   page event interfaces, &PageRenderListener; and &PageCleanupListener; as well;
simply
   implement the interface and leave the rest to the framework).
  @@ -294,7 +550,7 @@
   </para>
   
   <example>
  -	<title>Persistent Component Properties</title>
  +	<title>Manual Persistent Component Properties</title>
   <programlisting>
   public class MyComponent extends &BaseComponent; implements &PageDetachListener;
   {
  @@ -323,7 +579,7 @@
       }
       
       /**
  -     *  The method specified by &PageDetachListener;
  +     *  The method specified by &PageDetachListener;.
        *
        **/
       
  @@ -334,99 +590,13 @@
   }
   </programlisting>
   </example>
  -	
  -</section> <!-- state.component-properties -->
   
  -<section id="state.declarative-properties">
  -	<title>Declarative Properties</title>
  -	
   <para>
  -If all those extra methods are at all intimidating, don't fear, Tapestry provides another
approach
  -to dealing with transient and persistent properties in pages and components: 
  -<emphasis>declarative properties</emphasis>.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -Declarative properties make use of a &spec.property-specification; element in the
  -page or component specification.  Tapestry does something special when a component
  -contains any such elements; it dynamically generates a subclass that provides the desired
fields,
  -methods and whatever extra initialization or cleanup is required.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -You may also, optionally, make your class abstract, and define abstract accessor methods
that will
  -be filled in by Tapestry in the generated subclass.  This allows you to read and update
properties inside
  -your class, inside listener methods.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -Properties defined this way may be either transient or persistent.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -The previous example, of a persistent page property, can be reworked as the following:
  +Again, there is no particular need to do all this; using the
  +&spec.property-specification; element is far, far simpler.	
   </para>
   	
  -<example>
  -<title>Declarative Persistent Page Property: Java Class</title>
  -<programlisting>
  -public abstract class MyPage extends &BasePage;
  -{
  -    abstract public int getItemsPerPage();
  -	
  -    abstract public void setItemsPerPage(int itemsPerPage);
  -}
  -</programlisting>
  -</example>	
  -
  -<example>
  -<title>Declarative Persistent Page Property: Page Specification</title>
  -<programlisting>
  -<![CDATA[
  -<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
  -<!DOCTYPE page-specification PUBLIC 
  -	"-//Howard Lewis Ship//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN" 
  -	"http://tapestry.sf.net/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd">
  -	
  -<page-specification class="MyPage">
  -
  -  <property-specification name="itemsPerPage" persistent="yes" type="int" initial-value="10"/>
  -
  -</page-specification>
  -]]>
  -</programlisting>
  -</example>	
  -
  -<para>
  -Again, making the class abstract, and defining abstract accessors is <emphasis>optional</emphasis>.
  -It is only useful when a listener method will need to update the property.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -This exact same technique can be used with components as well as pages, which vastly simplifies
  -the coding necessary, since it is not longer necessary to directly use
  -the &PageDetachListener; interface.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -A last note about initialization.  After Tapestry invokes the <function>finishLoad()</function>
  -method, it processes the initial value provided in the specification.  If 
  -the <literal>initial-value</literal> attribute is ommitted or blank, no change
takes place.
  -Tapestry then takes a snapshot of the property value, which is retains 
  -and uses it at the end of each request cycle
  -to reset the property back to its "pristine" state.
  -</para>
  -
  -<para>
  -This means that you may perform initialization for the property inside
  -<function>finishLoad()</function> (instead of providing a <literal>initial-value</literal>).
 However,
  -don't attempt to update the property from <function>initialize()</function>
... the order of operations
  -when the page detaches is not defined and is subject to change.
  -</para>
  -
  -
  -</section>  <!-- state.declarative-persistent-properties  -->
  -
  +</section> <!-- state.manual-component-properties -->
   
   <section id="state.stateless">
   	<title>Stateless Applications</title>
  
  
  
  1.5       +38 -14    jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide/spec.xml
  
  Index: spec.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide/spec.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- spec.xml	24 Jan 2003 00:49:34 -0000	1.4
  +++ spec.xml	7 Feb 2003 04:28:12 -0000	1.5
  @@ -26,32 +26,32 @@
   	<entry>Application</entry>
   	<entry>application</entry>
   	<entry>&spec.application;</entry>
  -	<entry><literal>-//Howard Lewis Ship//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  -	<entry><literal>http://tapestry.sf.net/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>-//Apache Software Foundation//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>http://jakarta.apache.org/tapestry/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
   </row>
   
   <row>
   	<entry>Page</entry>
   	<entry>page</entry>
   	<entry>&spec.page-specification;</entry>
  -	<entry><literal>-//Howard Lewis Ship//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  -	<entry><literal>http://tapestry.sf.net/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>-//Apache Software Foundation//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>http://jakarta.apache.org/tapestry/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
   </row>
   
   <row>
   	<entry>Component</entry>
   	<entry>jwc</entry>
   	<entry>&spec.component-specification;</entry>
  -	<entry><literal>-//Howard Lewis Ship//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  -	<entry><literal>http://tapestry.sf.net/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>-//Apache Software Foundation//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>http://jakarta.apache.org/tapestry/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
   </row>
   
   <row>
   	<entry>Library</entry>
   	<entry>library</entry>
   	<entry>&spec.library-specification;</entry>
  -	<entry><literal>-//Howard Lewis Ship//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  -	<entry><literal>http://tapestry.sf.net/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>-//Apache Software Foundation//Tapestry Specification 1.4//EN</literal></entry>
  +	<entry><literal>http://jakarta.apache.org/tapestry/dtd/Tapestry_1_4.dtd</literal></entry>
   </row>
   
   <row>
  @@ -1184,7 +1184,13 @@
   </para>
   
   <para>
  -Defines a formal parameter of a component.
  +Defines a formal parameter of a component.  Parameters may be connected 
  +(<literal>in</literal> or <literal>form</literal>)
  +or unconnected (<literal>custom</literal>).  If a parameter is
  +connected, but the class does not provide the property (or does, but
  +the accessors are abstract), then the framework
  +will create and use a subclass that contains the implementation
  +of the necessary property.
   </para>
   
   <figure>
  @@ -1210,7 +1216,7 @@
   	a valid Java identifier.</entry>
   </row>
   <row>
  -  <entry>java-type</entry>
  +  <entry>type</entry>
     <entry>scalar name, or class name</entry>
     <entry>no</entry>
     <entry/>
  @@ -1218,7 +1224,7 @@
      the type of the JavaBean property that a connected
      parameter writes and reads.  The property must
       match this exact value, which can be a fully specified class name,
  -    or the name of a scalar Java type.
  +    or the name of a scalar Java type.  
      </entry>
     </row>
     
  @@ -1406,10 +1412,21 @@
   
   <para>
   It is acceptible for a page (or component) to be abstract, and have abstract accessor methods
  -matching the names that Tapestry will generated for the subclass.  This can be
  +matching the names that Tapestry will generate for the subclass.  This can be
   useful when setting properties of the page (or component) from a listener method.
   </para>
   
  +<para>
  +A connected parameter specified in a &spec.parameter; element may also cause an enhanced
subclass
  +to be created.
  +</para>
  +
  +<para>
  +An initial value may be specified as either the <literal>initial-value</literal>
  +attribute, or as the body of the <sgmltag class="starttag">property-specification</sgmltag>
element
  +itself.
  +</para>
  +
   <figure>
   	<title><sgmltag class="starttag">property-specification</sgmltag> Attributes</title>
   <informaltable>
  @@ -1594,6 +1611,13 @@
   </para>
   
   
  +<para>
  +The value to be assigned to the bean property can be specified
  +using the <literal>expression</literal> attribute, or as
  +the content of the <sgmltag class="starttag">set-property</sgmltag> element
  +itself.
  +</para>
  +
   <figure>
   	<title><sgmltag class="starttag">set-property</sgmltag> Attributes</title>
   <informaltable>
  @@ -1618,7 +1642,7 @@
   <row>
   	<entry>expression</entry>
   	<entry>string</entry>
  -	<entry>yes</entry>
  +	<entry>no</entry>
   	<entry/>
   	<entry>The OGNL expression used to set the property.
   	</entry>
  
  
  
  1.5       +21 -6     jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide/configuration.xml
  
  Index: configuration.xml
  ===================================================================
  RCS file: /home/cvs/jakarta-tapestry/doc/src/UsersGuide/configuration.xml,v
  retrieving revision 1.4
  retrieving revision 1.5
  diff -u -r1.4 -r1.5
  --- configuration.xml	25 Jan 2003 02:34:03 -0000	1.4
  +++ configuration.xml	7 Feb 2003 04:28:12 -0000	1.5
  @@ -58,7 +58,7 @@
   <callout arearefs="configuration.web.servlet-class">
   	<para>
   	The servlet class is nearly always &ApplicationServlet;.  There's rarely
  -	a need to create a subclass; Tapestry has many hooks for extending the
  +	a need to create a subclass; Tapestry has many other hooks for extending the
   	application.
   	</para>
   </callout>
  @@ -66,7 +66,8 @@
   	<para>
   	The Virtual Library application stores its specification on the classpath, rather
   	than under &WEB-INF;, so it is necessary to provide the complete
  -	path to the specification.
  +	path to the specification.  Most applications can omit this
  +	<sgmltag class="starttag">init-param</sgmltag>.
   	</para>
   </callout>
   <callout arearefs="configuration.web.url">
  @@ -289,13 +290,27 @@
   </varlistentry>
   
   <varlistentry>
  +	<term>net.sf.tapestry.global-class</term>
  +	
  +	<listitem>
  +	<para>
  +	The fully qualified class name to instantiate as the engine <literal>global</literal>
  +	property.  The Global object is much like Visit object, 
  +	except that it is shared by all instances
  +	of the application engine rather than being private to any particular session.
  +	If not specified, a synchronized instance of &HashMap; is used.
  +		</para>
  +	</listitem>
  +</varlistentry>
  +
  +<varlistentry>
   	<term>net.sf.tapestry.default-script-language</term>
   	
   	<listitem>
   	<para>
   	The name of a &BSF;-supported language, used when a
   	&spec.listener-binding; element does not specify
  -	a language.  The "factory default" is "jython".
  +	a language.  If not overridden, the default is "jython".
   	</para>
   	</listitem>
   	
  @@ -308,7 +323,7 @@
   	<listitem>
   	<para>
   	If not specified as "true", then the <literal>reset</literal> service
  -	will be non functional.  The reset service is used to force
  +	will be non-functional.  The reset service is used to force
   	the running Tapestry application to discard all cached data (including
   	templates, specifications, pooled objects and more).  This must
   	be explicitly enabled, and should only be used in development (in production,
  @@ -407,7 +422,7 @@
   
   	<listitem>
   	<para>A monitor is informed
  -	about key events during each request and it intended to support performance
  +	about key events during each request and is intended to support performance
   	monitoring.
   	</para>	
   	</listitem>	
  
  
  

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