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From Kris Schneider <k...@dotech.com>
Subject Re: [OT] Java Tip
Date Wed, 16 Nov 2005 13:26:45 GMT
Sure, it all boils down to your business requirements. Based on your 
original post, it really wasn't clear what constraints you were operating 
within. All else being equal, I'd opt not to create Calendar objects, but 
if you have to, you have to...

Lamine Ba wrote:
> Hi Khris,
> That's what I was doing before.  The problem with this strategy is that
> I also have to handle months in the calendar that are more or less than
> 30 days.  Moreover, there is no simple way to set the time to 0 and do
> Day operations only.
> 
> T Lamine Ba
> Software Intelligence for Real Estate Professionals.
> 
>  
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kris Schneider [mailto:kris@dotech.com] 
> Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 4:46 PM
> To: Tag Libraries Users List
> Subject: Re: [OT] Java Tip
> 
> Or, create yourself a utility class:
> 
> public class TimeConstants {
>      public static final long SECOND_MS = 1000;
>      public static final long MINUTE_MS = 60 * SECOND_MS;
>      public static final long HOUR_MS = 60 * MINUTE_MS;
>      public static final long DAY_MS = 24 * HOUR_MS;
>      // add another here for two days if it's used often enough
> }
> 
> Then:
> 
> return (timestamp.getTime() >= (System.currentTimeMillis() + (2 * 
> TimeConstants.DAY_MS)));
> 
> Lamine Ba wrote:
> 
>>I thought I should use Calendar.  However, I was not sure how to
>>manipulate the library.  Thanks for the tips Rahul and John.  They
> 
> will
> 
>>save me a lot of time.
>>
>>T Lamine Ba
>>Software Intelligence for Real Estate Professionals.
>>
>> 
>>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: John Byrd [mailto:john.byrd@darkspell.com] 
>>Sent: Tuesday, November 15, 2005 3:52 PM
>>To: Tag Libraries Users List
>>Subject: Re: Java Tip
>>
>>Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
>>cal.setTime(timestamp);
>>cal.add(Calendar.DATE, 2);
>>Date compareDate = cal.getTime();
>>if (timestamp.before(compareDate()) return false;
>>else return true;
>>
>>It's not Perl, but ...
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>Hi all,
>>>
>>>I am handling timestamps in one of my beans.  Can someone advise me on
>>>how to write the following script?  I am curious about what libraries
>>>you would be using... I am only using "java.util.Date" and it is not
>>>very flexible.
>>>
>>>Function to evaluate a date passed by the function process
>>>----------------------------------------------------------
>>>Boolean process(Date timestamp) {
>>>	If timestamp < (today+2days)
>>>		Return false;
>>>	Else
>>>		Return true;
>>>}
>>>----------------------------------------------------------
>>>Thank you for your consideration.
>>>T Lamine Ba
> 
> 

-- 
Kris Schneider <mailto:kris@dotech.com>
D.O.Tech       <http://www.dotech.com/>

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