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From conflue...@apache.org
Subject [CONF] Apache Tuscany: SCA Java User Guide (page edited)
Date Tue, 05 Feb 2008 20:54:00 GMT
SCA Java User Guide (TUSCANY) edited by Luciano Resende
      Page: http://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/display/TUSCANY/SCA+Java+User+Guide
   Changes: http://cwiki.apache.org/confluence/pages/diffpagesbyversion.action?pageId=44873&originalVersion=121&revisedVersion=122






Content:
---------------------------------------------------------------------

{section:border=true}
{column:width=15%}
{include: SCA Java Subproject Menu}
{include: Java SCA Menu New}
{column}
{column:width=85%}

Welcome to the Apache Tuscany SCA User guide. Here you will find information aimed to help
you understand SCA concepts and an example walk through for building your own SCA application.



\\
{panel:title=Apache Tuscany SCA User Guide|borderStyle=solid|borderColor=#C3CDA1|titleBGColor=#C3CDA1|bgColor=#ECF4D1}
* [*Introduction*|#Intro]
* [*Quick Guide to SCA* |#Quick Guide to SCA]
* [*Example Walkthrough*|#Example Walkthrough]
  ** [Getting Set Up|#Getting Set Up]
  ** [Running The Calculator Sample|#Running The Calculator Sample]
  ** [Building The Calculator Sample In Java|#Building The Calculator Sample In Java]
  ** [Using more advanced features in calculator|#What Next]
* [*Create OnLineStore SCA composite application*|#OnlineStore application]
* [*Tuscany SCA Domain Implementation*|#Tuscany SCA Domain Implementation]
* [*Tuscany SCA Extensions*|#Tuscany SCA Extensions]
  ** [The Extensible Runtime|#The Extensible Runtime]
  ** [Available Extensions|#Available Extensions]
  ** [Using Extensions|#Using Extensions]
* [*Hosting Environments*|#Hosting Tuscany Java SCA]
* [*Tuscany SCA And IDEs*|#Tuscany SCA And IDEs]
  ** [Using The Samples In An IDE Without Maven|#Using The Samples In An IDE Without Maven]
  ** [Using The Samples In An IDE If You Have Maven|#Using The Samples In An IDE If You Have
Maven]
\\
 
{panel}

{note:title:Notification}{center}This page is under construction\- You are welcome to help
and complete it{center}{note}

h2. {anchor:Intro}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Introduction{bgcolor}

This user guide will help you become familiar with SCA concepts and walks you through an example
that demonstrates how to build an SCA application. It also describes the different environments
that Tuscany supports (such as command line clients or web applications) and how to package
up applications to run in these environments.


*There's nothing to it really!* Building SCA applications is easy. One of the main goals of
Tuscany and SCA is to avoid imposing rules and requirements on how people write applications.
We want to let people write application code the way they want without being concerned about
the environment in which it will be used. After all, writing code to handle plumbing just
gets in the way of writing the interesting stuff. So basically, you write the code for interesting
bits, and Tuscany provides the environment that lets it run. Therefore, this guide is just
an example of how an SCA application can be developed and is not a rule.


h2. {anchor:Quick Guide to SCA}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Quick Guide to SCA {bgcolor}

The [*quick guide to SCA*|Quick Guide To SCA] gives you an overview of SCA concepts and prepares
you to work on the example below. You can skip this step if you are already familiar with
SCA.

For more details on SCA please refer to the specifications at [Open SOA web site|http://www.osoa.org].

h2. {anchor:Example Walkthrough}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Example Walkthrough{bgcolor}

h3. {anchor:Overview of Example}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Overview of Example{bgcolor}

We will use the calculator sample to walk through the steps for building an SCA application.
As the name indicates, this example performs typical calculator operations. It is given two
numbers and asked to perform an operation on them. Our calculator will handle add, subtract,
multiply and divide. 

We start with a simple variation of the calculator example and extend it to include more advanced
SCA features.

h3. {anchor:Getting Set Up}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Getting Set Up{bgcolor}

* Download [Tuscany Java SCA release|http://incubator.apache.org/tuscany/sca-java-releases.html].
Please download the latest binary release.  You can use the source code release but you will
have to use Maven at all stages.
* Download prerequisites 
  ** [Java 5|http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/index.jsp]
  ** [Maven 2.0.4+|http://maven.apache.org/download.html]

If you want to build the sample with Ant rather than Maven you will need to download Ant instead
  ** [Ant 1.7.0|http://ant.apache.org/bindownload.cgi]

h3. {anchor:Running The Calculator Sample}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Running The Calculator Sample{bgcolor}

Calculator is provided as a sample under SCA Java binary distribution. Let's first run the
sample before we go about
building it. It is easy!

* Go to the directory ..\samples\calculator
{code}
ant run
{code}

Alternatively if you want to run the sample directly from the command line try the following.

* if you are using Windows issue the command:
{code}
java -cp ..\..\lib\tuscany-sca-manifest.jar;target\sample-calculator.jar calculator.CalculatorClient
{code}
* if you are using *nix issue the command:
{code}
java -cp ../../lib/tuscany-sca-manifest.jar:target/sample-calculator.jar calculator.CalculatorClient
{code}

You should see the following result:

3 + 2=5.0
3 - 2=1.0
3 * 2=6.0
3 / 2=1.5

If you are using the source disitribution then we suggest you use Maven to build and run the
calculator sample because the tuscany-sca-manifest.jar is not provided with the source distribution.
This jar is part of the binary distribution and collects together all of the tuscany jars
in one place so that the java command line is nice and short when running samples.

h3. {anchor:Building The Calculator Sample In Java}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Building The Calculator
Sample In Java{bgcolor}

h4. What you will learn
This example illustrates how to define your application while staying focused on the business
logic. It walks you through the steps of building a composite application called calculator.
All connections between the components within the composite are local and defined using Java
interfaces.

h4. Example walk-through
*Step 1 - Define what building blocks are needed:* Think about how your application can be
broken down into smaller functions/services. Each block is a logical unit of operation that
can be used in the overall application. In this case, calculator application can be divided
into five blocks: AddService block, SubstractService block, MultiplyService block and DivideService
block and a main block that takes a request and routes it to the right operation. We have
called this main block the CalculatorService  
!CalculatorBlocks2.jpg|align=centre!

(?)TODO - need to update the diagram to change Add -> AddService etc. Who has the editable
version?

*Step 2 - Implement each block:* Now that you have identified the blocks of functionality
in your application, you are ready to create each block. In SCA the blocks of functionality
are referred to as components so let's look at how we implement a component. We'll take the
AddService component as our first example. 

The AddService component will provide a service that adds two numbers together. The CalcualtorService
component uses the AddService component whenever it is asked to perform additions. If we were
writing the AddService component in plain old Java we would start by describing a (Java) interface.

{code}
public interface AddService {

    double add(double n1, double n2);
}
{code}

Now, we provide an implementation of this interface.

{code}
public class AddServiceImpl implements AddService {

    public double add(double n1, double n2) {
        return n1 + n2;
    }
}
{code}

But wait! Aren't we writing an SCA component? It must be more complicated that that - the
mere, plain old Java interface and implementation, right? Well, actually an SCA component
can just be plain old Java so we have just done all the coding we needed to implement the
SCA AddService component. We can use SCA to expose the service that the AddService component
provides over any of the supported bindings, for example, WebServices, JMS or RMI, without
changing out the AddService implementation.

Let's take a look at the CalculatorService component. This is interesting because it's going
to call the AddService component. In the full application it will call the SubtractService,
MultiplyService and DivideService components as well, but we will ignore these for the time
being as they follow the same pattern as we will implement for the AddService component. 

Again we will start by defining an interface because CalcultorService is itself providing
an interface that others will call.

{code}
public interface CalculatorService {

    double add(double n1, double n2);
    double subtract(double n1, double n2);
    double multiply(double n1, double n2);
    double divide(double n1, double n2);
}
{code}

Now we implement this interface. 

{code}
public class CalculatorServiceImpl implements CalculatorService {

    private AddService addService;
    private SubtractService subtractService;
    private MultiplyService multiplyService;
    private DivideService divideService;
   
    @Reference
    public void setAddService(AddService addService) {
        this.addService = addService;
    }

    ...set methods for the other attributes would go here

    public double add(double n1, double n2) {
        return addService.add(n1, n2);
    }

    ...implementations of the other methods would go here
}
{code}

*Step 3 - Assembling the application:* 
So all well and good but how do we actually run these two components. Well of course the java
programmer in us want's to get down to it, write a mainline to connect our two components
together and run then. We could still do that easily in this case.

{code}
public class CalculatorClient {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        CalculatorServiceImpl calculatorService = new CalculatorServiceImpl();
        AddService            addService        = new AddServiceImpl();
        calculatorService.setAddService(addService);
      
        System.out.println("3 + 2=" + calculatorService.add(3, 2));
        // calls to other methods go here if we have implemented SubtractService, MultiplyService,
DivideService
    }
}
{code}

But this doesn't run using the Tuscany SCA runtime and extending this code to provide web
services interfaces, for example, would be a little more complicated. What do we have to do
to make it run in Tuscany where we get all things like web service support for free? Well,
not much actually. First let's change the client to fire up the Tuscany SCA runtime before
calling our components. 

{code}
public class CalculatorClient {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        SCADomain scaDomain = SCADomain.newInstance("Calculator.composite");
        CalculatorService calculatorService = scaDomain.getService(CalculatorService.class,
"CalculatorServiceComponent");

        System.out.println("3 + 2=" + calculatorService.add(3, 2));
        // calls to other methods go here if we have implemented SubtractService, MultiplyService,
DivideService

        scaDomain.close();
    }
}
{code}
You can see that we start by using a static method on SCADomain to create a new instance of
itself. The SCADomain is a concept in SCA that represents the boundary of an SCA system. This
could be distributed across many processors. For now, lets concentrate on getting this working
inside a single Java VM. 

The parameter "Calculator.composite" refers to an XML file that tells SCA how the components
in our calculator application are assembled into a working application. Here is the XML that's
inside Calculator.composite. 

{code}
<composite xmlns="http://www.osoa.org/xmlns/sca/1.0"
           name="Calculator">

    <component name="CalculatorServiceComponent">
	<implementation.java class="calculator.CalculatorServiceImpl"/>
        <reference name="addService" target="AddServiceComponent" />
        <!-- references to SubtractComponent, MultiplyComponent and DivideComponent  -->
    </component>

    <component name="AddServiceComponent">
        <implementation.java class="calculator.AddServiceImpl"/>
    </component>

    <!-- definitions of SubtractComponent, MultiplyComponent and DivideComponent -->

</composite>
{code}
You can see that we define two components here and specify the Java implementation classes
that Tuscany SCA needs to load to make them work. These are the classes we have just implemented.

Also note that the CalculatorServiceComponent has a reference named "addService". In the XML,
this reference targets the AddServiceComponent. It is no coincidence that the reference name,
"addService", matches the name of the addService field we created when we implemented CalculatorServiceImpl.
The Tuscany SCA runtime parses the information from the XML composite file and uses it to
build the objects and relationships that represent our calculator application. It first creates
instances of AddServiceImpl and CalcualtorSreviceImpl. It then injects a reference to the
AddServiceImpl object into the addService field in the CalculatorServiceImpl object. If you
look back at how we implemented the CalculatorService you will see an @Reference annotation
that tells SCA which fields are expecting to be set automatically by SCA. This is equivalent
to this piece of code from our normal Java client.

{code}
        CalculatorServiceImpl calculatorService = new CalculatorServiceImpl();
        AddService            addService        = new AddServiceImpl();
        calculatorService.setAddService(addService);
{code}

Once the composite file is loaded into the SCADomain our client code asks the SCADomain to
give us a reference to the component called "CalculatorServiceComponent". 

{code}
        CalculatorService calculatorService = scaDomain.getService(CalculatorService.class,
"CalculatorServiceComponent");
{code}

We can now use this reference as though we had created it ouselves, for example, from the
CalculatorServiceImpl.add() method implementation.

{code}
return addService.add(n1, n2);
{code}

The SCA specifications often descibe SCA applications is diagramatic form. This often helps
give a quick overview of what components ar part of an application and how they are wired
together. If we draw a diagram of what we have build in the calculator sample we come up with
something like.

!calculator.png|align=centre!

You will notice that diagrams are provided with all of our samples. If you like to take a
visual approach to things this may help you become quickly familiar with the components in
the samples. Take a look at the ".png" files in the top level directory of each sample.

*Step 4 - Deploying the applcation:* 

So as long as the "Calculator.composite" file is present on our class path, along with the
rest of the tuscany jars, we can run our sample as we did  previously. The samples come with
an Ant build.xml file that allows the sample files to be rebuilt so if you want to experiment
with the sample code you can do so and then recompile it. 

{code}
ant compile
{code}

Once recompiled you can run it as before in the [Running The Calculator Sample|SCA Java User
Guide#Running The Calculator Sample] section, for example, we provide a run target in the
Ant build.xml file so the calculator sample can also be run using. 

{noformat}
ant run
{noformat}

h3. {anchor:What Next}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Using more advanced features in calculator{bgcolor}

Looking back, the client code we have written to start the calculator application using the
Tuscany SCA runtime is no longer than a normal Java client for the application. However we
do now have the XML composite file that describes how our application is assembled. 

This concept of assembly is a great advantage as our applications become more complex and
we want to change them, reuse them, integrate them with other applications or just further
develop them using a programming model consistent with all our other SCA applications. Regardless
of what language is used to implement each of them. 

For example, lets say our calculator sample is so poweful and popular that we want to put
it on the company intranet and let other people access it as a service directly from their
browser based Web2.0 applications. It's at this point we would normally start reaching for
the text books to work out how to make this happen. As we have an XML file that describes
our application it's easy in Tuscany SCA. The following should do the trick. 


{code}
<composite xmlns="http://www.osoa.org/xmlns/sca/1.0"
           name="Calculator">

     <service name="CalculatorService" promote="CalculatorServiceComponent/CalculatorService">
         <interface.java interface="calculator.CalculatorService"/>
         <binding.jsonrpc/>
     </service>    

    <component name="CalculatorServiceComponent">
		<implementation.java class="calculator.CalculatorServiceImpl"/>
        <reference name="addService" target="AddServiceComponent" />
        <!-- references to SubtractComponent, MultiplyComponent and DivideComponent  -->
    </component>

    <component name="AddServiceComponent">
        <implementation.java class="calculator.AddServiceImpl"/>
    </component>

    <!-- definitions of SubtractComponent, MultiplyComponent and DivideComponent -->

</composite>
{code}

All we have done is added the <service> element which tells Tuscany SCA how to expose
our CalculatorServiceComponent as a JSONRPC service. Note that we didn't have to change the
Java code of our components. This is just a configuration change. The helloworld-jsonrpc sample
shows a working example of the jsonrpc binding. 
(?) TODO - we don't have a JSONRPC version of the calculator sample

If we really wanted a SOAP/HTTP web service we can do that easily too. The helloworld-ws-service
and helloworld-ws-reference samples show you how to work with web services. 
(?) TODO - we don't have a web services version of the calcualtor sample

SCA allows other kinds of flexibility. We can rewire our components, for example, using a
one of the remote bindings, like RMI, we could have the CalculatorServiceComponent running
on one machine wired to a remote version of the application running on another machine. The
calculator-rmi-service and calculator-rmi-reference samples show the RMI binding at work.
 

We could also introduce components implemented in different languages, for example, let's
add the SubtractServiceComponent implemented in Ruby.  

{code}
<composite xmlns="http://www.osoa.org/xmlns/sca/1.0"
           name="Calculator">

    <component name="CalculatorServiceComponent">
        <implementation.java class="calculator.CalculatorServiceImpl"/>
        <reference name="addService" target="AddServiceComponent" />
        <reference name="subtractService" target="SubtractServiceComponent" />
        <!-- references to MultiplyComponent and DivideComponent  -->
    </component>

    <component name="AddServiceComponent">
        <implementation.java class="calculator.AddServiceImpl"/>
    </component>

    <component name="SubtractServiceComponent">
        <implementation.script script="calculator/SubtractServiceImpl.rb"/>
    </component>

    <!-- definitions of MultiplyComponent and DivideComponent -->

</composite>
{code}

Of course we need the Ruby code that implements the component. 

{code}
def subtract(n1, n2)
    return n1 - n2
end
{code}

The Tuscany SCA runtime handles wiring Java components to Ruby components and performs any
required data transformations. The calculator-script sample shows different script languages
in use. 

So, now that our application is desribed as an SCA assembly there are lots of possibilities
as we futher develop it and integration it with other applications. The following sections
provide more detail on the features provided by Tuscany SCA.

h2. {anchor:OnlineStore application}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Creating An OnLineStore SCA composite
appllication{bgcolor}
Now that you are familiar with SCA concepts you can use this step by step guide to create
an OnlinStore composite SCA application which provides a web interface to a shopping cart.
This excercise will take less than half an hour and it familiarizes you with the steps of
creating and running a real SCA composite application.  Although Eclipse IDE is used, no previous
knowledge of Eclipse is required. You can easily see how the same steps can be used in your
favorite IDE.

[Want to Create my own OnlineStore SCA application|http://incubator.apache.org/tuscany/sca-java-releases.data/onlineStore.pdf]

h2. {anchor:Tuscany SCA Domain Implementation}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Tuscany SCA Domain Implementation{bgcolor}

You will have seen from the previous example walkthrough, and from the SCA overview, that
SCA has the concept of a domain. Section 10 of the SCA Assembly specification describes an
SCA Domain as defining "the boundary of visibility for all SCA mechanisms". SCA wires can
be used to connect components within a single SCA Domain.

>From the previous calculator sample you can see that the wires between the component references
and services, formed by adding a target component name to a reference, are resolved inside
an SCA domain. 

{code}
<component name="CalculatorServiceComponent">
        <implementation.java class="calculator.CalculatorServiceImpl"/>
        <reference name="addService" target="AddServiceComponent" />
        <reference name="subtractService" target="SubtractServiceComponent" />
        <reference name="multiplyService" target="MultiplyServiceComponent" />
        <reference name="divideService" target="DivideServiceComponent" />
    </component>

    <component name="AddServiceComponent">
        <implementation.java class="calculator.AddServiceImpl"/>
    </component>
{code}

To connect to services outside of the SCA Domain (whether they be services provided by SCA
or by other means) you configure an explicit binding, for example,  lets assume that the AddServiceComponent
is a non-sca web service out there on the network somewhere. As this is outside the SCA domain
we can use an explicit remote binding to talk to it. 

{code}
 <component name="CalculatorServiceComponent">
		<implementation.java class="calculator.CalculatorServiceImpl"/>
        <reference name="addService" >
           <interface.java interface="calculator.AddService" />        
            <binding.ws uri="http://localhost:8080/sample-calculator-ws-webapp/AddServiceComponent"/>
       
        </reference>   
        <reference name="subtractService" target="SubtractServiceComponent"></reference>
        <reference name="multiplyService" target="MultiplyServiceComponent"></reference>
        <reference name="divideService" target="DivideServiceComponent"></reference>
    </component>
{code}


Tuscany SCA supports running an SCA Domain in a single JVM or spread across multiple JVMs,
potentially on different machines. 

!distributed-abstract.png|align=centre!

Tuscany doesn't provide a single Java program that is the domain or the node. If you look
at the samples provided with Tuscany you will see them using the SCA Domain interfaces in
various different ways. Follow the links for instructions for using the [Standalone SCA Domain]
and the [Distributed SCA Domain] interfaces. 

h2. {anchor:Tuscany SCA Extensions}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Tuscany SCA Extensions{bgcolor}
h3. {anchor:The Extensible Runtime}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}The Extensible Runtime{bgcolor}
The Tuscany SCA runtime comprises a small set of core software which deals with:

* Managing extesions to the Tuscany SCA Runtime(_core_)
* Building and in memory assembly model of SCA applications (_assembly_)
* Processing SCA applcations that are contributed (_contribution_) 
* Supporting databindings (_databinding_)
* Supporting Tuscany SCA when its embedded in other environments (_embedded_)
* Supporting Tuscany SCA when its running in a servlet container (_http_)

The collections of interfaces that describe these features are referred to as the System Programming
Interface (SPI). The [developer guide|SCA Java Developer Guide] discusses them in more detail
but from a user perspective the important thing to realize is that the majority of interesting
functionality in Tuscany SCA is provided by extensions which build upon this core SPI. These
extensions provide Tuscany SCA with its ability to support a wide variety features.

* Implementation types
* Binding types
* Databinding types
* Interface description styles
* Hosting environments

So to understand how to use the Tuscany SCA runtime is to understand how to use its extensions.


h3. {anchor:Available Extensions}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Available Extensions{bgcolor}
More often than not using an extension involves adding information to the SCDL files or the
implementation files but this is not always the case. The links below describe each of the
extensions and how they can be used and configured. 

{table:border=0}
{table-row}
{table-cell}
h3. {anchor:Implementation Types}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Implementation Types{bgcolor}
{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.java|SCA Java implementation.java]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for SCA components implemented with Java classes{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.script|SCA Java implementation.script] {table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for SCA components implemented with scripting languages{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.spring|SCA Java implementation.spring]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for spring{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.91{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.resource|SCA Java implementation.resource]{table-cell}
{table-cell}exposes file resources{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.91{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.bpel|SCA Java implementation.bpel]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for components implemented in BPEL{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 1.0{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.osgi|SCA Java implementation.osgi]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for osgi{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 1.0{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.xquery|SCA Java implementation.xquery]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for components implemented in xquery{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 1.0{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[implementation.widget|SCA Java implementation.widget]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support wiring of SCA components in Web 2.0 style applications{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 1.0{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-cell}
h3. {anchor:Protocol Bindings}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Protocol Bindings{bgcolor}
{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.ajax|SCA Java binding.ajax]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Communication with AJAX clients{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.jms|SCA Java binding.jms]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Asynchronous JMS messaging{table-cell}
{table-cell}Under development{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.jsonrpc|SCA Java binding.jsonrpc]{table-cell}
{table-cell}The JSON-RPC protocol{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.rmi|SCA Java binding.rmi]{table-cell}
{table-cell}The Java RMI protocol{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.ws|SCA Java binding.ws]{table-cell}
{table-cell}SOAP/HTTP web services{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.ejb|SCA Java binding.ejb]{table-cell}
{table-cell}EJB Binding{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.rss|SCA Java binding.rss]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Consumes or provides an RSS feed{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.91{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[binding.atom|SCA Java binding.atom]{table-cell}
{table-cell}supports Atom-publishing (a standard REST protocol), allowing you to create, retrieve,
update, delete Atom entries {table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.91{table-cell}
{table-row}

{table-row}
{table-cell}
h3. {anchor:Data Bindings}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Data Bindings{bgcolor}
{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}databinding-axiom{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for AXIOM databinding{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}databinding-jaxb {table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for&nbsp;JAXB databinding {table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}databinding-sdo{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support for&nbsp;SDO databinding&nbsp;{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}databinding-sdo-axiom{table-cell}
{table-cell}Support optimzed SDO to AXIOM transformation{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}
{table}


h3. {anchor:Using Extensions}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Using Extensions{bgcolor}
Extensions are loaded into the Tuscany SCA runtime using the Java service loading mechanism.
Each extension is packaged as a jar and provides a file;

{code}
META-INF/services/org.apache.tuscany.sca.core.ModuleActivator
{code}

Using this information the Tuscany SCA runtime will load each extensions present on the the
Java CLASSPATH. So if you want to use a particular feature make sure that it's available on
your classpath. Conversely if you don't want a particular feature to be active remove it from
the classpath. 

Writing a new extension is a subject in its own right and is described in the [extension guide|SCA
Java Extension Development Guide]

h2. {anchor:Hosting Tuscany Java SCA}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Hosting Environments{bgcolor}
Apache Tuscany SCA Java runs in the following host environments.

{table:border=0}
{table-row}
{table-cell}
{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}[host.embedded|SCA JAVA host.embedded]{table-cell}
{table-cell}A simple embedded host that boots Tuscany core and application from the same classpath{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}host-webapp{table-cell}
{table-cell}Intialises the Tuscany runtime for use in a Web Application{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}http-jetty{table-cell}
{table-cell}The integration between Tuscany and the Jetty&nbsp;web container{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}http-tomcat{table-cell}
{table-cell}The integration between Tuscany and the Tomcat web container{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 0.90{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}Apache Geronimo{table-cell}
{table-cell}[How to run in Geronimo?|SCA Java host.geronimo]{table-cell}
{table-cell}Available from 1.0{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}Websphere Application Server {table-cell}
{table-cell}[How to run with Websphere Application Server?|SCA Java host.Websphere]{table-cell}
{table-row}
{table-row}
{table-cell}
{table}


h2. {anchor:Tuscany SCA And IDEs}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Tuscany SCA And IDEs{bgcolor}
h3. {anchor:Using The Samples In An IDE Without Maven}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Using The Samples In
An IDE Without Maven{bgcolor}

We don't provide any IDE project files with our disitributions so you will have to import
the sample files into your IDE manually. Here's an example of how it can be done using Eclipse.
Here the directory tuscany_sca_install_dir is the directory whch holds the Tuscany SCA Java
binary installation after it's been extracted from its archive file, for example, for the
0.90 release this will be tuscany-sca-0.90-incubating.
 
In a new or existing workspace

* Create a new java project to represent the sample you want to work on, e.g.
{noformat}
my working dir/calculator
{noformat}
* Import all of the sample code and resources into this project, e.g.
{noformat}
Use the File,Import menu and then select  tuscany_sca_install_dir/samples/calculator from
the filesystem
{noformat}
* Configure the source path to include
{noformat}
tuscany_sca_install_dir/samples/calculator/src/main/java
tuscany_sca_install_dir/samples/calculator/src/main/resources
{noformat}
* Configure the output folder to be
{noformat}
tuscany_sca_install_dir/samples/calculator/target
{noformat}
* Configure the build path to include all of the jars provided in
{noformat}
tuscany_sca_install_dir/lib
{noformat}
* If you select calculator.CalculatorClient.java and run as "Java Application" you should
see
{noformat}
3 + 2=5.0
3 - 2=1.0
3 * 2=6.0
3 / 2=1.5
{noformat}

The details of how to do this for other development environments will vary but the process
will be similar. 

h3. {anchor:Using The Samples In An IDE If You Have Maven}{bgcolor:#C3CDA1}Using The Samples
In An IDE If You Have Maven{bgcolor}

If you are a Maven user you can use it to generate all of the IDE project files for you automatically.
This works best if you generate IDE projects for all of the Apache Tuscany modules. You can
then include the ones you are interested in working with in you IDE. 

To build IDE project files for all of the modules in Apache Tuscany SCA;

{noformat}
cd sca 
{noformat}

If you are an Eclipse user do the following

{noformat}
mvn -Peclipse eclipse:eclipse  
{noformat}

If you are an IDEA user do the following 

{noformat}
mvn idea:idea
{noformat}

These commands generate project files for each module in Apache Tuscany SCA. The modules you
are interested in can now be included in your IDE, for example, in Eclipse, if you create
a new Java project and use the option to "create a new project from existing source" you can
specify an SCA module directory, which includes the generated project files, and Eclipse will
treat it like any other Java project.


{HTMLcomment:hidden}{children:sort=creation}{HTMLcomment}

{column}
{section}

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