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From "Michael Landon - IBN" <mlan...@ibnads.com>
Subject Compressing requests/results...
Date Thu, 02 Oct 2003 15:25:59 GMT
We've been using xml-rpc for about a year now & are very impressed with its capabilities.
 A problem, however, has been the increased bandwidth requirements when sending xml streams
(as opposed to binary object streams).  The good thing, though, is that these xml streams
are perfect candidates for compression.  So, if I could make a small request, maybe the XmlRpcClientLite
& WebServer objects could incorporate the use of

    Accept-Encoding: gzip
and
    Content-Encoding: gzip

headers.  Here's how I could see it functioning:

  The client's request would include the "Accept-Encoding: gzip" header.  The server would
always look for that header...and if found, the server would encode the response w/ the built
in Java GZIPOutputStream object and then include the "Content-Encoding: gzip" header w/ the
results.

  Alternatively, if the incoming client's request included the "Content-Encoding: gzip" header,
the server would decode the request w/ the built in Java GZIPInputStream object & respond
as above.

  If neither header is not found, the server responds as normal (no compression), but includes
the "Accept-Encoding: gzip" header w/ its results.  

  Back on the client side, if the client receives results w/ the "Content-Encoding: gzip"
header, it would decode the results w/ the built in GZIPInputStream object.  From that point
on, the client would always send compressed requests (including the "Content-Encoding: gzip"
header).

  If the client receives the "Accept-Encoding" header from the server, the client would process
the results as normal (no decompression) but from that point on would compress all requests.

I think this method would allow for full backward compatibility w/ older versions of xmlrpc
and not break any spec rules.  It just seems like such a simple enhancement with many benefits.
 Thoughts?

Michael



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