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From Hean Seng <heans...@gmail.com>
Subject Re: Cloud Provider Interested in CloudStack
Date Wed, 16 Dec 2020 02:33:01 GMT
I have the same dilemma. as well when evaluating .

To me, choosing a platform, other than features or design,  time to get
live ,  time of support,  recovery time if issues happen, deployment time
is alway very important consideration .

Openstack is very component based design, each of the services has its own
unique name , and before you go into it, you need to understand their
terms,  Network,  they call it Neuron etc.
Each of one component has one individual server running on it, and either a
physical server or by container .   Installation of Openstack. is painful
,   the standard documentation published online is not working,  it
definitely will come out with some unknown errors that you have to fix one
by one .   The  fastest that you can get Openstack up and test is the
install the All-In-One package, but that is not really recommended for
production use.

The whole process of getting up Openstack probably needs about 6months for
a proper Experience LInux System Admin .   I don't really think of Junior
Sys Admin able to get it up so soon with those many un-documented
installation processes . Those installation frmm installation scripts like
Ansible etc , is not an easy taak,  a lot of parameters that you need to
know one by one.

Another thing that you need to consider is the upgrade and maintenance,  if
you run a hosting company,  you have to make sure enough / spare engineers
that are always ready to support this . If one engineer is leaving, you may
have the headache of going through another time of a long learning curve.

Even though not engaging new engineer, Openstack is still under a massive
development and bugfix , twice a year, Upgrade will become a painful thing
if you have a lot of hypervisors out there and are not really familiar of
the system and have so many components.

While for Cloudstack,  the only 3 processes needed,  Management Server,
Agent and if you need an optional Usage server .  You can very fast
provision a Compute Hypervisor , doesn't not need any Ansible etc.  Just
use the yum and apt from the repository to install.   It is convenient and
fast .

For the features , both are similar , or you are looking at some very
specific features ?  Like DB as service , Storage as a service those ?

Openstack has the advantage that  a lot more hardware providers create
drivers for it, for example  Storage .  But this proprietary storage
provider, that you do not always need it,   If you do not want to lock by
Storage provider and need Ceph, it is supported in Cloudstack as well.

Modular Design of Openstack is advantage for Developer to fully focus on
some component and integration by API, however it is painful for the
implementor if is not properly documented.

I could safely say, you can up the cloudstack and be familiar with it
within one month time, while it seems not possible for Openstack.





On Tue, Dec 15, 2020 at 6:56 PM Andrija Panic <andrija.panic@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Hi Ivet,
>
> just send them this page:
>
> https://cloudstack.apache.org/users.html
>
> There is a reason why Apple, BT, KDDI and so many more providers have
> chosen CloudStack - those huge organisations surely do have $$$ to spend
> but they have chosen CloudStack for reasons others have already explained
> here.
>
> Cheers,
> Andrija
>
> On Tue, 15 Dec 2020, 11:09 Rene Moser, <mail@renemoser.net> wrote:
>
> > I can confirm this what Daan said, openstack needs orchestration tool to
> > update components in particular order. It's doable but needs pretty good
> > knowledge about each service and component and compatibility to each
> > other and versions running.
> >
> > Exposing openstack api to public is not a thing I would recommend, many
> > clouds create their own api on top. As a consequence, tooling and
> > integration must be developed. an investment in time and knowledge must
> > be made.
> >
> > Cloudstack is much easier to manage and the api can be exposed to the
> > public. Some public clouds based on cloudstack just have reduces the
> > features exposed to the api but have not changed api, though existing
> > integration, like orchesration and tooling can be used. Onboarding for
> > customers will be much better covered.
> >
> >
> > On 15.12.20 09:00, Daan Hoogland wrote:
> > > Ivet, the simplest way to put it is that cloudstack is a turnkey
> > solution,
> > > while openstack is a set of frameworks. You will need to have your
> infra
> > > components in place, but then you can start orchestrating them without
> > > having to write much "glueing" software to get an orchestration
> > platform. I
> > > don't know the current state of openstack, so an honest comparison is
> not
> > > possible but this basic difference has always been there.
> > > In addition to that your client will have to look at support matrices
> for
> > > hard- and software in both.
> > >
> > > regards,
> > >
> > > On Mon, Dec 14, 2020 at 2:28 PM ip <ip@storpool.com.invalid> wrote:
> > >
> > >> Hello everyone,
> > >>
> > >> At StorPool we have a customer interested to migrate from one cloud
> > >> management system to another. He is considering options and thinking
> for
> > >> OpenStack and CloudStack.
> > >>
> > >> Does somebody want to share some experience with him?
> > >> Maybe some from ShapeBlue can say a few words to him about the
> > CloudSatck
> > >> advantages. I already shared a few, but a more technical perspective
> > will
> > >> be better.
> > >>
> > >> Thank you all in advance,
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> *Ivet Petrova Madzharova*
> > >> *Marketing Manager*
> > >>
> > >>
> > >> *StorPool Storage*
> > >> m:
> > >> l:
> > >> +359883321596
> > >> linkedin.com/in/ivpetrova <http://www.linkedin.com/in/ivpetrova>
> > >> e:
> > >> w:
> > >> ip@storpool.com
> > >> www.storpool.com
> > >>
> > >> [image: https://www.storpool.com] <https://www.storpool.com>
> > >>
> > >
> > >
> >
>


-- 
Regards,
Hean Seng

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